Home » Monday Moment » Discussions » World’s Largest Snowflakes

World’s Largest Snowflakes

Hey Sparkles! Happy Monday! For today’s Monday Moment post, I am writing about the world’s largest reported snowflakes. I live in Georgia, and snow is very rare, and has always fascinated me. Can you guess where the record came from? Hint: It wasn’t in Georgia.

The world’s largest snowflakes were reported in a snowstorm on January 28, 1887 in Fort Keogh, Montana. These snowflakes were reported to be 15 inches (38 cm) wide and 8 inches (20 cm) thick. This record made its way into the Guinness World Records book. A rancher reported these snowflakes as being “larger than milk pans.”

However, due to the fleeting nature of snowflakes, the evidence is sketchy at best. Scientifically, there is no limit to the size of snowflakes, but they have never been proven. Many people have joined the hunt for big flakes, using laser probes that measure flakes accurately.

Even NASA and its international partners have joined the hunt for giant snowflakes with satellites that measure global precipitation, including snowfall. The work is seen as crucial for climate studies. The first satellite flew in 2013, at an overall mission cost of roughly $1 billion.

Well, that’s all I have for you today, Sparkles. I hope you found this as interesting as I did. What do you think: Can there really be 15 inch snowflakes? Tell me in the comments below. Thanks for reading, and Sparkles away!

One Response so far.

  1. Grandaddy Mike says:

    If that snowflake is solid water, ice crystal: it might hurt if it landed on your nose or head. A fifteen inch block of ice falling from the sky conking me in the noggin? I’d prefer the regular sized small and lightweight (probably less than a postage stamp size & weight) snowflakes. Might get famous if the huge one could be photo’ed and placed in the book of world records.
    Granddaddy Mike

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *